What’s a reasonable conversion rate for visits to my website?

conversion rate

I took a call from a friend-wedding professional. In a matter of fewer than 30 seconds, I was incredibly annoyed.

He asked me what seemed like a simple question:

“What’s a reasonable conversion rate for visits to my website?”

In laymen’s terms, that would mean, for every 100 people who visited your site, what percentage either filled out an inquiry form or called you directly for more information? 5%, 10%, 25%…. more?

My response:

“How did those people find your website (and in what percentages)… search engines, The Knot, local websites, in response to email…?”

He gave me a non-specific, all-of-the-above (I don’t really know, answer).

My shoot from the hip response was… “I’d be pleased with a 5% to 10% conversion rate.” That seemed low to him.

Here is what really flipped me out. He said, “Well I’m asking the same question to various people to get their opinion.”

So, he’s crowd-sourcing a poorly conceived question of people who don’t have solid backup data and getting their opinion. What the devil will that accomplish.

Then I started in…

“Every time you hear me speak about websites, I emphasize the importance optimizing your website for user-friendliness (to encourage conversions) before obsessing over search engine optimization.”

He didn’t remember it that way. Essentially, he remembered I emphasize SEO. HE WASN’T LISTENING or HE WAS LISTENING WITH SELECTIVE PERCEPTION AND MEMORY.

I spent a few minutes detailing obvious deficiencies in his website (some of which I pointed out 18 months ago before he launched it). The site is graphically better than most but lacks in many other ways… including maintaining the blog.

THE LESSON: If you ask opinions, using badly formed question, you get nothing of value. If you want a real evaluation, pay for it, and live with it. A neutral party will point out issues that are under your nose.

Then, act on those answers, and get up to speed.

End of rant!! Listen up!

Andy Ebon
The Wedding Marketing Authority
The Wedding Marketing Blog

Website Designers Shouldn’t Hold You Hostage

website designersMany wedding businesses have hired a person or company to create its website, thinking the site is a permanent fixture. Website designers should remind you the site is not a work in progress needing continued care and improvement. Sometimes years pass without having a single thought of making a single change to a website.

Time for an update?

What happens when it’s time to make an update even if just a small one?

Today is as good as any to look at your site to see if updates or changes are needed. If you have not recently been in touch with your web designer, he or she may be unreachable. Complications ensue if you did not protect your investment by getting a copy of the files of the website. Not to mention the username and password to gain access to the website.

Do you have your domain registrar contact information (i.e. GoDaddy, Network Solutions, etc.,)? You may not own your site’s domain name even though you bought it.

Have you changed your email address? As a result, you may not receive important information on renewing your domain name or hosting of the website. This means you can lose your domain name and website – permanently.

Here are some action steps:

  1. Contact your web designer and ask for the FTP (file transfer protocol) information with the username and password to have access to your website.
  2. Ask for a copy of all website files sent to you on CD, DVD or flash drive. Learn how to download and backup your files.
  3. If you reserved your domain name, find the registrar and hosting information, and check the expiration date of the domain name. If your web designer reserved the name for you, ask them to transfer the domain name to your control.
  4. Have access to the company hosting the site. A host transmits your site pages to the computer when a customer types in or clicks on a link of your domain name. It is essential to have access to the username and password and aware of the renewal date.
  5. Make sure the host and registrar have your current email address on record to receive important notifications about renewals or expired credit cards on the account.
  6. When you dismiss or change webmasters, make sure to update passwords so they no longer have access to your accounts.
  7. If you own a site that has a database, such as a site with a blog or a dynamic shopping cart, make sure regular backups are being made.
  8. If elements of your site were created using layered Photoshop files or Flash, make sure those raw files are backed-up as well.

Otherwise one day your site could suddenly be inaccessible or updates can become costly. If you contact a new web design company for assistance let it be because you chose to, and not because you had to.

Andy Ebon
The Wedding Marketing Authority
The Wedding Marketing Blog

Perfect Wedding

Just for laughs, I ‘googled’ the phrase Perfect Wedding. Sadly, it received almost 40 million results.

A lot of people living in fantasy land, either believing or creating unrealistic expectations.

You’re not helping create those unrealistic expectations, are you? Just say no!

perfect wedding

Andy Ebon
The Wedding Marketing Authority
The Wedding Marketing Blog

15,000 Twitter followers grow

silly-twitter-iconTwitter followers grow, like Facebook friendsLinkedIn connections, or Pinterest followers is NOT simply a numbers game. I can hear you giggling in the distance. REALLY!! It’s NOT just a numbers game!

I know, it seems counter-intuitive to hear that anyone who has just passed 15,00 followers on Twitter, is trying to play it down. Actually, I’m not trying to play it down. There is a different number, far more important to me. It’s 95%

My Twitter presence is tightly framed. It’s about WEDDING MARKETINGand connecting with wedding industry people in the English-speaking world. A while back, someone asked me, jokingly, “Why limit yourself to the English-speaking world?” Easy answer, unlike my mom and dad who spoke eight and three languages, respectively, I didn’t get the language gene. I’ve still got a lot of territory to visit in English-speaking countries.

In the headline, I reference the number, 25,000. If I retained every follower, I’d have 25,000 or more, in total. I reject about two out of three. 

Here are some reasons and profiles for rejection:

  • No logical reason for connection: a plumber in Wichita has no reason for following me or vice versa.
  • No multi-level marketers or get-rich quick businesses.
  • Profile states a large number of unrelated interests and hobbies, but no purpose.
  • No headshot or company logo
  • No website address
  • No Tweetaholics: A disproportion of posts to followers. (i.e. 27,000 posts; 172 followers).
  • … and there are more reasons… to many to list.

Except for a scant 5%, or fewer, made up by friends, musicians, and smattering of others, the 95% are exclusively wedding and hospitality industry types, including media.

Anyone who visits my Twitter page and looks at who follows me, OR who I follow, recognizes that I’m there for a single purpose, wedding marketing.

Whether your Twitter-universe is 1000, 10,000, or 100,000, it your relationships should be concise. Otherwise you’re wasting time and dealing with lots of digital noise.

If you have a Twitter account, have a reason for being there, and focus. Focus on who you follow, who follows you, and specific interaction.

Andy Ebon - wedding marketing expert

Andy Ebon
Wedding Marketing Expert
The Wedding Marketing Blog